Project Members:

Jewel Bryant

Janice Strasser-King

Katie Winafeld


 Infusing Technology into READ 180

Introduction
READ 180 is an intensive reading intervention program that focuses on assisting students whose literacy, vocabulary, and comprehension skills are below proficient level. The program is comprised of instructional software, leveled readers, and coordinating lessons. Because the students in the program often lack motivation and confidence when dealing with text, we are proposing that if we implement technology into the lessons then the students will be more likely to not only show more interest in the lessons but that they will also process and retain more information. Additionally, because the program is so scripted and rudimentary, it is our belief that the students will appreciate the challenge and the relevance of the technology infusion. It is our assumption that the students are more proficient and comfortable with technology than with texts, therefore, in giving them the opportunity to work with a learning tool that they are more proficient with, they will have the confidence to perform and the motivation to excel.

Topic

Our unit is taken from Read 180. This third unit stems from a study of literature and is titled Long Journey to Justice. The primary focus of the unit is injustice, particularly the injustice of apartheid in South Africa with a sub focus on "blood diamonds". The unit is grounded with a short story titled Diamond Land, a story about a teenage boy who struggles to provide for his family and his future bride after his family's cows, their main resource, die of disease. Ayize, the main character, leaves his village in hopes of working in the diamond mines as a means of earning money to purchase new cows. The story takes place during apartheid and in reading it; students will examine the injustice of apartheid. In conjunction to this short story, students will also read a nonfiction text: Nelson Mandela: In His Own Words--the inaugural speech given on May 10, 1994 by Nelson Mandela, the President of South Africa. In it, students will hear his poignant response to apartheid.
Although apartheid is somewhat a thing of the past, injustice is not. The topic of injustice is most relevant and appropriate particularly for this group of high school students. Many of them frequently voice their frustrations with the injustice they feel at not being honors students and at the unjust treatment they feel they receive as a result. They also express their frustrations with their family’s financial status and often feel that it is unjust that their standard of living is not at par with some of their peers. We hope to help them broaden their perspective by showing them through these selected texts that injustice is a global issue.
Through examination of the texts, we hope to guide the students in identifying theme as well as tone. Through socratic discussion, students will be able to make connections to the texts. Through the assignments, students will have the opportunity to recall, summaries, and synthesize what they’ve learned. They will also be able to mimic the writing techniques that they observed in the texts, such as the creation of tone, symbolism, imagery and the effect and precision of diction. They will use various forms of technology to create inspired products that present their understanding of the topic and the techniques studied as well as express their personal connections and perspectives. In creating these products, students will utilize the writing process as well as develop their writing skills. Lastly, students will review proper ethical use of images,texts, and audio .

Standards

Common Core:
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts grades 9-10:


Reading-Literature:

Key Ideas and Details
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Craft and Structure
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Writing:

Production and Distribution of Writing

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.


AASL:

1. Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge.
2. Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge.
3. Share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our democratic society.
4. Pursue personal and aesthetic growth.

Skills
Dispositions in Action
Responsibilities
Self-Assessment Strategies
2.1.6 Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.
3.1.5
Connect learning to community issues.

4.1.2
Read widely and fluently to make connections with self, the world, and previous reading.
4.1.3
Respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres.
4.1.5
Connect ideas to own interests and previous
knowledge and experience.
4.1.8
Use creative and artistic formats to express personal learning.

1.2.3
Demonstrate creativity by using multiple resources and formats.
2.2.4
Demonstrate personal productivity by completing products to express learning.
3.2.1
Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal situations.
1.3.3
Respect copyright/ intellectual property rights of creators and producers.
2.3.1
Connect understanding to the real world.
2.4.3
Recognize new knowledge and understanding.

The Setting and Context

Frederick High School is located in the heart of Frederick, MD. Its 1300 students are incredibly diverse, with a 55% minority, 33% FARMS, and 8% special education population that is also highly transient. Even with such diversity, FHS boasts a strong community consisting of faculty, parents, alumni, and locals with enduring traditions, something which most schools cannot claim.
However, as the oldest school in the county, and yet to be renovated since the 70s and 80s, FHS falls short of a true technological atmosphere. Whole computer labs are disabled when computers cannot be fixed or replaced fast enough; most teachers are lucky to have a data projector and a document camera; professional development on newly available technologies or web programs are barely offered because the network cannot handle the activity. Developing technology integrated lessons can be a challenge!

One particular group that could greatly benefit from technology integrted lessons is Ms. Winafeld's 10th grade Read180 class. Thankfully, because this is a reading intervention class, the class size is fairly small and often there are always enough working computers to facilitate such lessons. These twelve students have been targeted for reading intervention assistance and placed in the year-long, co-taught class with the hopes of increasing their reading and writing skills. Their reading abilities range from 350 (1st grade)-1000 (9th grade) on the Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI), a reading assessment test. While the SRI isn’t the be-all end-all indicator of reading ability, it is relatively accurate. Most of the students are also combating learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, behavioral problems, home instability, and other gaps in their overall general education; nine of the twelve students have Individualized Education Plans (IEP)s, two have Behavior Improvement Plans (BIP)s, all of them are FARMS. Their technological abilities also vary. Some of the students have technologies, such as computers, cell phones, video game consoles, etc., while others have never even owned a cell phone. However, these students do use their public resources, and most have visited the public library to make use of their computers and Internet.

The Read180 program itself is designed by Scholastic. It is scripted and must be followed as specified. There are ten units, each of a different topic and containing cross-curricular information, such as science, technology, and art. Each unit contains specific vocabulary and focuses on different reading, writing, and grammar skills. The units begin with an anchor video, to establish background information, and vocabulary. Students then read two-four selections related to the unit. These selections usually contain a mix of fiction and non-fiction pieces. Because there are ten units, our goal is to complete one unit per month of the school year, giving us about fifteen days. Each class day begins with twenty minutes of whole group, direct instruction, followed by three twenty-minute rotations, and ending with ten minutes of wrap-up. The three rotations are small group, where students and a teacher continue the discussion on a more individualized level, computers, where students work on Scholastic’s software program that develops their reading, spelling, and vocabulary ability, and independent reading, where students choose novels to practice their individual reading concerns. We have a Read180 classroom that contains five large tables, six computers with an individual network, and shelves of Read180 approved novels ranging from first to eleventh grade reading levels; a special education teacher runs the Read180 program and co-teaches with the ninth and tenth grade Read180 teachers on Read180 days.

The first challenge associated with Read180 is that the learning goals and indicators associated with Read180 are completely different, and from an earlier curriculum, than the tenth grade curriculum set by Frederick County Schools (which is focused around American Literature). Trying to make connections between the two is incredibly difficult, but the county has suggested making the Read180 topics the focus of the course, and therefore connecting any literature in the English classroom to those goals.

Another challenge, and sometimes blessing, to the program is the scheduling. FCPS high school classes are divided by four ninety minute blocks a day, and the year is divided into two semesters. A normal tenth grade English class would only run for a semester, or four months. However, the Read180 program allows for a year-long class, still ninety minutes each, with these students, which can be incredibly beneficial. Teachers are better able to develop relationships with this cohort, and the students have an entire year to prepare for their tenth grade HSA. However, because we have four Read180 sections each year, two ninth and two tenth, but only one Read180 lab and only one Read180 special education co-teacher, the program cannot be run daily. Instead, throughout the year, students spend one day in English class and the next in Read180. This gives an opportunity for both classes to have equal time in the Read180 lab. One section of ninth grade and one section of tenth grade are offered first and third block, and they rotate every other day in the lab. This creates a completely disjointed program. One day students are working with the Read180 software and the next they are learning the tenth grade curriculum. This means two different sets of novels, vocabulary, grammar, and writing activities every other day. It’s confusing enough as a teacher trying to plan for both curriculums and have it make sense, let alone being a student who already has learning issues and trying to keep track of it all!

Integrating different types of technology will give these students a sense of ownership and independence in an atmosphere that causes most of them to feel babied and unintelligent. The scaffolding that the technology can provide will increase their critical thinking and organizational skills, as well as their computer literacy skills since many of these students do not have any technology available to them at home.

The Materials and Technology Tools You will Need

Lesson 1
  • Freedom for South Africa Video Story
Students will watch this background video before reading the selections in the text about apartheid in South Africa. The video focuses specifically on the treatment of the natives, their experiences with blood diamonds, and Nelson Mandela's effect on the country.
  • Read180 Diigo Account
Students will access example videos on our class Diigo account and analyze the tone of each selection.
  • Microsoft MovieMaker
Students will choose images, video, and music to create their own short video about their feelings on apartheid.
  • Snapfish, Shutterfly, FreeDigitalPhotos
Students will use these websites to find photos for their videos.
  • School Databases
Studnets will access the FCPS databases to find addional multimedia for their videos.

Lesson 2
  • Nelson Mandela: Inagural Speech - May 10, 1994
Students will read the inagural speech, use the speech as a basis for the discussion of symbolism, and then create their own poster combining symbolism and tone.
  • Individual computers with built-in microphones (12)
In order to create a symbol and a limited text communication of their feelings of apartheid, students will need computers. The built in microphones are necessary
for the next project that students will be completing.
  • Microsoft Powerpoint
Students will be using Microsoft Powerpoint as one way of creating a symbol for apartheid. Students may also use powerpoint to create their poster.
  • Microsoft Publisher
Students will be using Microsoft Publisher as one way of creating a symbol for apartheid. Students may also use publisher to create their poster.
  • Glogster
Students may use Glogster to create their poster.

Lesson 3
  • Individual computers with built-in microphones (12)

In order to write their poem using MSWord and to create and present their project using PhotoStory, students will need computers with built in microphones to
record their narration into Photostory.
  • Microsoft Word
Students will need to write there poem or prose with the assistance of MSWord features like Spell check and Grammar check.
  • Digital cameras with USB cords (12)
The third lesson focuses on using images to support and evoke a tone and to convey a message in an original poem or prose. Students will have the option of using
photographs or images that they have taken or created or using non copyrighted images that they locate on the web or in print.
  • Inspiration
Students will use this great concept mapping tool to create their outlines for their writing piece. This tool makes it easy for students to edit and manipulate their
outline.
  • Microsoft PhotoStory
Students will present their original poem or prose using Photostory
  • LCD Projector and Screen
In order to showcase their photostory presentation to their peers, a screen and projector will be needed.

The Implementation & Assignments

We will spend four weeks on this unit. Because of the challenges that our students face, it is necessary to go at a slower pace. Students need ample time to process and retain information. We want to be sensitive to their learning issues as well as their emotional needs. Rushing through lessons will only frustrate and discourage the students. We want these students to feel capable and self assurred that they have enough time to master the skills that we will be teaching. Also, because for most students, the school is the only place where they have access to a computer, we want to give the students the opportunity to show forth their best work. At the end of their lessons, students work will be placed (with student permission) on the school's website to share with their learning community as well as their family and community at large.

Pre-requisite for lesson: teacher training (45 minutes)
  • Teacher can determine when and how to be trained (face-to-face or via YouTube)
1. Introduce the topic with selected texts (two 90 minute class periods)
  • Discuss theme and technique
  • Assess reading and vocabulary comprehension
2. Expand knowledge (one 90 minute class period)
  • Watch and discuss video
3. Retell information learned (four 90 minute class periods)
  • Lesson one
    • Review pictures and decide on tone
    • Watch anchor video and analyze tone
    • Choose three videos to analyze for tone
    • Create a video using Microsoft MovieMaker that fulfills a specific tone

4. Summarize theme and key concepts (two 90 minute class periods)
    • Lesson two
· Read non fiction text from Nelson Mandela
· Discuss symbolism in relationship to Nelson Mandela as a symbol of freedom, justice and equality to the country of South Africa
· Create a symbol using Microsoft Powerpoint or Publisher

5. Bridge texts with personal experiences (six 90 minute class periods)
      • Lesson three
· Use Inspiration to create concept map of injustice
· Inspired by concept map, use inspiration to create an outline of reading response
· Write reading response (poem/prose)
· Use rubric to assess writing
· Collect/take images to create PhotoStory
· Prepare and present PhotoStory
· Use rubric to assess presentation

The Lessons

Throughout the reading of the short story, students will identify story elements, answer comprehension questions, decode and define vocabulary words, as well as write brief constructed reading responses. Examining the speech will give us the opportunity to identify and review literary elements such as repetition and theme. With both the story and the speech, we will determine writing techniques that the author used to create tone. We will analyze how story elements, diction, repetition lend themselves to the development of tone, theme, and symbolism. We approximate that this will take about a two class periods to accomplish. Following the readings and discussions, students will assess their comprehension of the vocabulary words found within the texts as well as their overall comprehension of the texts. Review and assessment of vocabulary and key comprehension concept will take up one 90 minutes class period.
In summary, the students will first extend their understanding of apartheid by watching a film that accompanies the text. They will then retell what they have learned in an informative video of their own. Following that, the students will summarize and synthesize what they’ve learned by creating a symbolic poster that summarizes the key concepts, theme, and tone of the text. Lastly, the students will apply what they have learned about tone and the theme in an original poem that relates their own experience or perspective. Rubrics will be used to assess the students’ comprehension of the topic, composition of an original response, and the presentation used to convey their ideas and understanding.
Lesson 1

Winafeld Lesson
Indicator:
· The student will utilize the reading process (preview, preread, initial reading, reflection, revised reading, communication of a response) to respond to non-print texts. LA.E10.10.01a
· The student will examine meaning by determining how the speaker, organization, sentence structure, word choice, tone, rhythm, and imagery reveal an author’s purpose. LA.E10.10.02
· The student will analyze how the elements or aspects of a literary work reveal an author’s, editor’s, artist’s, director’s, or producer’s purpose. LA.E10.10.02a
· The student will apply before-, during-, and after-reading strategies when responding to non-print text, e.g., film, speakers, theatre, performance, audio text, and interactive media. LA.E10.10.01
· The student will utilize the reading process (preview, preread, initial reading, reflection, revised reading, communication of a response) to respond to non-print texts. LA.E10.10.01a
· The student will examine meaning by determining how the speaker, organization, sentence structure, word choice, tone, rhythm, and imagery reveal an author’s purpose. LA.E10.10.02
· The student will analyze how the elements or aspects of a literary work reveal an author’s, editor’s, artist’s, director’s, or producer’s purpose. LA.E10.10.02a
· The student will explain how devices such as staging, lighting, blocking, special effects, or other techniques unique to a non-print medium are used to create meaning and evoke response. LA.E10.10.07

Objective:
SWBAT: 1. Identify tone in a non-print text (specifically a video)
2. Explain the effect the producer wanted to create for his viewers based on tone
3. Create a video that presents a specific tone and explain what effect it should have created for the viewer
Assessment:
1. Tone matching activity (informal classwork grade; 25 points)
2. Anchor video’s tone identification and explanation with support (informal classwork grade; 25 points)
3. Final video reflecting a specific tone and purpose (formal summative grade; 50 points)
Scoring Tool:
Rubric for final video product (50 points):

F (5 and below)
D (6 points)
C (7 points)
B (8 points)
A (9-10 points)
Content
Information was unrelated or nonexistent
Included less than minimum information
Included minimum information for project
Included additional related information to topic
Included additional, well-designed information to topic
Music
Music is not included
Music does not relate to topic or reflect appropriate tone
Music reflects tone
Music reflects tone, is slightly varied, and has minimum break in flow
Music reflects tone, is varied, and has a consistent flow
Transitions
Transitions do not occur because material is unfinished
Transitions are heavily choppy and do not always fit the content
Transitions are slightly chopping, but appropriate to the content
Transitions are smooth and appropriate to the content
Transitions are smooth, numerous, and appropriate to the content
Length
Below 35 seconds
36-41 seconds
42-47 seconds
48-53 seconds
54-65 seconds
Color scheme
Color choice does not fit the tone
Some colors are appropriate to the tone
All colors are appropriate to the tone
All colors are appropriate to the tone, and contrasts can be seen through the colors
All colors are appropriate to the tone, contrasts are seen through the colors, and the music, content, and colors are connect
Warm-Up (Day One):
Students, who sit at tables of three, will be given five pictures and fifteen cards each with a different tone words on them. As a group, they need to decide the appropriate tone for each picture and write a short explanation of why they felt that fit best. Pictures may have multiple tones associated with them, but the students are only required to choose one for each. As a group, we will discuss possible tones, reasons why those particular tones would fit, and what the photographer’s purpose would be. Each group will receive 25 classwork points (5 for each photograph).

Tone Word
Definition
Accusatory
Charging of wrong doing
Apathetic
Indifferent because you are tired or do not care
Callous
Unfeeling, insensitive to others
Derisive
Ridiculing, mocking
Forthright
Directly honest without hesitation
Gloomy
Darkness, sadness, rejection
Haughty
Proud and vain to the point of arrogance
Indignant
Marked by anger aroused by injustice
Matter-of-fact
Accepting of conditions without an emotional response
Morose
Surly and sullen
Objective
An unbiased view; leaving personal opinions aside
Optimistic
Hopeful, cheerful
Reflective
Illustrating innermost thoughts and emotions
Reverent
Treating a subject with honor and respect
Solemn
Tending toward sad reflection

Pictures:
Apartheid_picture_one.jpgApartheid_picture_two.jpgApartheid_picture_three.jpgApartheid_picture_four.jpgApartheid_picture_five.jpg
Picture One Picture Two Picture Three Picture Four Picture Five

Direct Instruction (Day One): (see it)

At the beginning of each unit, we watch an anchor video that is associated with the unit’s readings. As we watch the video, I will point out and write down details about the lighting techniques, musical choice, color significance and shift, and choice of words by the narrator and director. After finishing the video, we will review our notes and decide what tone would match the video and why. Together we will compose a paragraph explaining the tone, what details in the video led to our conclusion, and how that tone could reveal the director’s purpose for creating the video.
At this poitn in the semester, students have already had experience discussing tone, so this activity will serve as a refresher. Because they are able to work as a group, students will participate more and feel more comfortable bouncing ideas off one another. Also, the point of writing the paragraph together serves twofold; they see my expections for both content and writing conventions.

Guided Practice (Day One): (do it with help)

During their computer time, students will work in pairs to identify tone in three different videos about apartheid. They will write short explanations for each of their findings, explaining how and why they came to that conclusion. Then, they will identify the director’s purpose. They will access these videos from our class Diigo account. (20 points)
Again, since they are not quite comfortable with the material, I've lessened the number of students working together, but I have also given them a chance to bounce ideas off one another. This will slowly make them more independent. Most of the videos they are watching, taken from TeacherTube, are students made, so they will also see examples of their final products.

Independent Practice (Days 2-4): (do it themselves)
For a final project (in the English classroom), students will use Microsoft MovieMaker to create their own videos about apartheid. They will need to choose photos, video, music, and textual content that reflect a specific tone and purpose. We will spend three days in the English classroom, 45 minutes a day, to create these videos. (50 points)
I choose MovieMaker because the students either have taken in the past semester or are currently taking a technology course in which they have used MovieMaker. They are all comfortable with the technology and will have a chance to play around with it this second time. We will review fair use laws wtih the librarian at the beginning of the project so that students know where they can find photos and/or video, how much music they can add to their video, which databases are the most useful, and how to cite any materials that need to be cited. She will be available for help while the students are in the lab finding materials and creating their videos.

Closure:
Students will share and discuss their videos with the class. We will conclude by discussing the importance of tone in a selection, and the effect that tone can have on the viewer. Students can upload their videos to our class Diigo account or submit them to TeacherTube if they would like.
This gives students a chance to practice their oral presentation skills and constructive criticism skills. We generally have great class discussions together.

Homework:
The first night, after Read180 class, students will need to create a rough sketch of their ideas. Then, for the next two nights, students will be responsible for finding pictures, videos, etc. for their project.
Lesson 2

Indicators: (FCPS Curriculum)
The student will explain how devices such as staging, lighting, blocking, special effects or other techniques unique to a non-print medium are used to create meaning and evoke response. LA.E10.10.07
The student will analyze how graphics influence meaning on a non-print text. LA.E10.10.07B

Objective:
Students will be able to identify symbols in a text and convey symbolism as well as tone in a self created work.

Materials:
Technology cart (laptop, document camera, data projector)
Student computers (12)
Microsoft Powerpoint/Publisher
Glogster
Nelson Mandela Inaugural Speech

Activator:
Students will view a "perspective poster" about the word "tolerance".

http://northernm.edu.glogster.com/false/

Direct Instruction:
The teacher will review the topic of symbolism in text. The students will be told to look for symbolism as they read and reread the speech. The teacher and the students will read the inaugural speech together. The students will read the speech to themselves silently, then together with the teacher the students will reread the speech. Once students have read the text, the teacher will ask questions about why Nelson Mandela might be seen as a symbol of freedom to the people of South Africa.

During the second half of the period, the teacher will discuss perspective posters. Perspective can change the meaning of words, phrases and even ideas. The students will be charged with creating a poster that shows there perspective about one of the three ideas that their symbol represents. They will use the same idea that they used to create their symbol.

Independent Practice:
Students will use Powerpoint or Publisher to create their own symbol in response to apartheid. The symbol can stand for freedom, justice or equality. Once students have created their symbol, they will create a perspective poster. Their poster will have to give the same tone as the symbol they created (freedom, justice, equality)

Closure:
Students will share their perspective posters and complete peer evaluations. Students will also give their input about the rubric that they will be graded on.

Assessment:
Peer evaluations and teacher rubric with student input.

Lesson 3

Lesson 3

Indicator
http://www.fcpsteach.org/docs/la_10.pdf
Objective
Materials
Activator
Direct Instruction
Independent Practice
Closure
Assessment/
Scoring Tool
Day 1
LA.E10.10.01 The student will apply before-, during-, and after-reading strategies when responding
to non-print text
LA.E10.10.02 The student will examine meaning by determining how the speaker, organization,
sentence structure, word choice, tone, rhythm, and imagery reveal an author's
purpose.
LA.E10.10.03a Evaluate elements of a literary work to determine how these elements create
theme
LA.E10.10.03b Analyze language choices to help explain the connection between a text and its
themes.
LA.E10.10.07 The student will explain how devices such as
graphics, language, and other techniques unique to a non-print medium are
used to create meaning and evoke response.
Students will be able to:

identify and list good writing and presentation techniques
Photostory presentation

Projector and screen

Computer linked to projector
Students will view a Photostory on injustice
Class will evaluate the presentation :
how organization,
sentence structure, word choice, tone, rhythm, and imagery reveal the author's
purpose and how these elements and the author’s language also create theme.

The class will also evaluate how devices such as
graphics, color, sound, and timing are
used to create meaning and evoke a tone.
Students will create a rubric for presentation effectiveness
Students will share and justify their rubric. The class will decide on the most valid criterion and a class rubric will be created
Check student rubrics for comprehensiveness
Day 2
LA.E10.20.07 The student will compose to express personal ideas, using prose and/or poetic forms.
The student will be able to:

construct an outline of a writing piece with good organizational structure
Projector and screen

Computer linked to projector

Inspiration

12 individual computers
The class will discuss injustice drawing from the texts and the presentation
The class will create a web of the types of injustice we encounter in various settings using Inspiration
Students will select an incidence of injustice to write about—personal or witnessed and create an outline for their rough draft using Inspiration
Students will share their outlines with the a classmate
Use a rubric to check the completeness and organization of the outline
Day 3
LA.E10.20.07 The student will compose to express personal ideas, using prose and/or poetic forms. LA.E10.20.03 The student will use suitable traditional and electronic resources to refine
presentations and edit texts for effective and appropriate use of language and
conventions, such as capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and pronunciation
The student will be able to:

compose a poem or prose with a central theme of injustice that adheres to the appropriate use of language and
Conventions
12 individual computers

MSWord

12 copies of student anthology containing a poem and prose
The class will read a poem and prose
The class will discuss the difference between poetry and prose
Students will select a format (poetry or prose) and write their rough draft using MSWord.
Students will peer conference and edit their drafts
Check drafts for appropriate use of language and
Conventions as well as organization.
Day 4
LA.E10.20.03 The student will use suitable traditional and electronic resources to refine
presentations and edit texts for effective and appropriate use of language and
conventions, such as capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and pronunciation
LAE10.40.03 The student will alter the tone of his or her text by revising its diction.
The student will be able to:

compose a poem or prose with a central theme of injustice that adheres to the appropriate use of language and
Conventions
12 individual computers

MSWord

12 copies of student anthology containing a poem and prose
The class will reexamine the poem and prose for evidence of how diction affects tone
-The class will review how to use a thesaurus in print as well as the one that MSWord provides.
-The class will brainstorm a list of words that evoke tone
Students will self revise and peer revise their rough drafts.
Students will share their revised drafts with a classmate.
Check drafts for altered diction and tone.
Day
5*& 6
(Friday)
Students can take pictures over the weekend
LA.E10.10.07 The student will explain how devices such as
graphics, language, and other techniques unique to a non-print medium are
used to create meaning and evoke response.
Students will be able to:
determine and select or take images, select music , adjust timing, and narrate in a way that best supports their theme and elicits a response from the reader.
12 individual computers w/ microphones

Digital cameras
Copyright true or false informal assessment
Discuss copyright laws
Discuss power of images
Brainstorm types of powerful images
Day 5
Students will take photographs or locate them from the internet
Day 6
Students will upload and arrange images, adjust timing, record narration, select background music
Students will peer check their presentations
Check for productivity
Day 7
LA.E10.10.07 The student will explain how devices such as
graphics, language, and other techniques unique to a non-print medium are
used to create meaning and evoke response.
Students will be able to:
*Identify good presentation skills
*Assess effectiveness of Photostory presentation
* exemplify good presentation skills
Photostory presentation

Projector and screen

Computer linked to projector
Students will watch and critic teacher’s presentation
Class will discuss pros and cons of presentation and the teacher will guide students in identifying good presentation characteristics and creating a rubric
Students will present their Photostory and will discuss the techniques they employed
Class will assess techniques the saw during presentations


References


Yerrick, R., Ross, D., & Molebash, P. (2004). Promoting equity with video: In the curriculum, science. Learning & Learning with Technology, 31(4), 16-19.

Mayer, R. E., & Moreno, R. (2003). Nine ways to reduce cognitive load in multimedia learning.//**Educational Psychologist**//, //**38**//(1), 43-52.