History and Social Media:

Introducing 18th Century Historical Figures to Facebook


Project Members: Natalie, Walter, and Kendra


Introduction
This unit aims to incorporate the use of social media into the teaching and learning of U.S. history. Using the 8th grade social studies standards for DCPS, students in an 8th grade social studies class at Alice Deal Middle School in Washington, DC will use Facebook to interact with documents and historical figures from the period of 1720-1787. The broad concept of the unit, adapted from the DC Content Standards for 8th grade social studies is that “Students [will] understand the major events preceding the founding of the nation and relate their significance to the development of American constitutional democracy.” Technology will facilitate this learning by connecting the students to the characters of the time period through social media.

Social media has several implications on learning. Teens and young adults are online more now than ever before. The Pew Research Center has produced a number of studies of teens’ relationships with social media, such as the study on millenials that finds “They share, they network. They're mobile; they're connected when they're away from home” (Millenials, 2010). Another Pew study on teens finds that “73% of wired American teens now use social networking websites, a significant increase from previous surveys. Just over half of online teens (55%) used social networking sites in November 2006 and 65% did so in February 2008” (Lenhart, Purcell, Smith, & Zickuhr, 2010). These numbers have significance in how these teens learn; Greenhow and Robelia (2009) find that teens using social media often engage in new literacies, maintain better social relationships, and offer useful feedback to their peers. As such, this lesson takes into account the fact that the student population at Alice Deal is relatively well connected online and involves this learning into the material. By incorporating a replica of a tool that the students at this school and in this class are very familiar with, students will begin to see that the historical figures studied were in fact real people. This will ideally peak their interest throughout the rest of the unit.

As a general overview, this unit plan includes lesson plans for a four-day study of 18th century historical figures. This particular chunk of the unit will occur after a one-day introductory class on the material by the students’ classroom teacher. The librarian and teacher will have met on what has been covered, so the librarian knows where the students are in their knowledge of the material. The library media specialist will teach the social media section of this larger unit, in an effort to connect to this audience of technologically-savvy 8th graders. The goal of these three lessons is to apply the historical figures’ personas to Facebook accounts, including interactions with other classmates’ chosen historical figures.

The focus of these four lessons will be on applying research skills, organizing information, and producing credible reports in a creative format. Students will get the chance to do extensive research and have experience with historical documents. Students will also draw comparisons to how life could have been different had they had social media like today. Library discussions will focus on the conversations that have occurred between historical figures on the fake Facebook account and how the possibility of these conversations would have affected history. Assessment will be both formative (in the form of discussions in the library) and summative (in the form of required postings and the completion of the Facebook profile of the chosen historical figure).

The study of the 18th century in general will be incorporated into the larger unit of the 18th century, “A New Nation,” in the 8th graders’ social studies class, continued for another three weeks after these initial lessons. Depending on how the social media experiment goes, the librarian will be willing to continue monitoring students’ posts as the unit continues. Assessment on these continued postings will occur at the discretion of the classroom teacher.

The following unit plan includes the aforementioned three lessons, as well as the standards for the DC Public Schools system and AASL’s 21st Century Learning standards. The setting and context of the school and the students who are participating in the unit will be discussed. Materials needed and the sequence of implementation are also included.

The Topic & Standards
Because of the DCPS standards, 8th grade social studies courses study the 18th century, and more specifically, the birth of America. Thus, this social media lesson will focus on applying research on 18th century revolutionary figures. Using the medium of the Facebook profile, students will analyze relevant information on their chosen historical persona and will build a profile based on their research.

Relevant DCPS standards include:
8.2. Broad Concept: Students understand the major events preceding the founding of the nation and relate their significance to the development of American constitutional democracy.
  • Analyze the philosophy of government expressed in the Declaration of Independence, with an emphasis on government as a means of securing individual rights (e.g., key phrases such as “all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights”).
  • Identify the political and economic causes and consequences of the American Revolution and the major battles, leaders, and events that led to a final peace (e.g., free press, taxation without representation).
  • Explain the nation’s blend of civic republicanism, classical liberal principles, and English parliamentary traditions.
  • Describe the functions and responsibilities of a free press

Because this four-day lesson plan is part of a larger unit, some of these points will be covered more in their social study class. By collaborating with the classroom teacher, the librarian will highlight those points that are most relevant to a study of social media and its contribution to analyzing historical figures through the medium of the profile. Analyzing the philosophy of government might be represented in students’ identification of their persona’s “belief,” as well as the figures they choose to be friends with on Facebook. The idea of the free press will be included as part of discussions on the impact of Facebook and other social media to our news media today. The students will also compare flow of information then with flow of information now to observe how social networking sites could have been used then.

As part of their research, students will study the important figures during this time period and their contributions to the founding of our country. They will look at historical meetings such as the Constitutional Conferences and the important documents they produced. The students will examine the meaning and purpose of these documents, and figure creative ways to advertise the historical figures proceedings on a social network. The students should look closely at their historical figures beliefs and how they influenced meetings, documents, and the country.

Other relevant standards include the 21st Century Learning Standards. Relevant points include:
Inquire, think critically, and gain knowledge
1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real world connection for using this process in own life.
1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning.
1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
1.1.6 Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning.
1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.
1.1.9 Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding.

The students will have the chance to seek knowledge about the historical time period. They will use prior knowledge and notes to formulate a place to begin their inquiry. Students will then research the time period using the Internet and database mining. They will get a chance to consult with classmates who have historical figures related to their own to get a broad overview of the time period. Students will narrow down and review sources to find appropriate content for their research and profile. They will then compile this information in an organized way to complete assignment.

Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create new knowledge
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
2.1.3 Use strategies to draw conclusions from information and apply knowledge to curricular areas, real world situations, and further investigations.
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.
2.1.6 Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.
2.3.1 Connect understanding to the real world.

Students will organize the compiled knowledge using the colored index cards to separate information (colored index cards= blue-personal information; green- historical documents; white- roles/jobs pertaining to founding of country; pink- miscellaneous information, such as know associates). They will then apply knowledge by creating and writing up a Facebook profile for their historical figure. The profile should be rich in information and as accurate as possible. It should draw on class notes, personal research, and classmates ideas on historical figures. Students will rely on their notecards to refresh their memories of their figure during the creation of the profile and the ongoing postings they will be conducting with classmates.

The Setting and Context
School Setting
The setting for our school is a public middle school in northwest Washington, DC. Our school has a diverse population, with the demographic composition being 44% African-American, 37% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic, and 7% Asian. The school participates in the International Baccalaureate curriculum. 29% of the students in the school participate in the free or reduced lunch program. While they have not reached their AYP targets the past two years, they did pass the DC CAS assessment. Both the location and the curriculum of the school dovetail well with our unit, as one of topics of study for 8th grade humanities is a study of the Revolutionary period in The United States.

Further, the assignment of imagining a Revolutionary period that has access to the social networking tools that we have today works nicely with the goals of the IB curriculum. Goals of the curriculum include the concepts of time, place, and change. The assignment promotes in-depth thinking with regards to the relationship between the actions of important historical individuals and their time and place in history. The creation of a “Facebook” style profile will engage students in thinking about concepts of “friends” and “statuses” in the Revolutionary period and contrasting them with their present-day equivalents.

Another benefit is that with the school being in the nation's capital, the importance of the lesson may come through even more strongly. With many of the principal individuals of the Revolutionary period spending some time in the area, it may pique the interest of students even further and inspire them to investigate on their own, not very far from their home.

Unit Plan: Challenges and Collaboration
This lesson is part of a larger unit on the revolutionary period. The teacher will introduce the time period in class, but the the librarian will teach the 4-day social media lessons alone. The teacher will follow up with more extensive teaching on the time period out of the school-assigned textbook, assessments (a test and a final paper on the student’s chosen historical figure), and a viewing of the musical 1776.

Some of the challenges of this set-up include the fact that the school librarian will be required to help with source material since the teacher will have only covered an introduction on the time period. This, of course, will have to be discussed with the library staff prior to implementing the unit. Another challenge is that students will likely need some help with online research and the Facebook lesson, so time will be tight in terms of covering the actual subject. This fact will be somewhat tempered with the subsequent instruction by the teacher, but the faculty must make sure that the students are not overwhelmed at the beginning of the unit. Also, the librarian will not be responsible for assessment of final paper on the historical figure, so it will be hard to determine how students take the social media lesson and apply it as part of a more traditional assignment.

Luckily, the social studies class meets every day and the library is on a flexible schedule. Thus the librarian will be able to teach the 4-day social media lesson in order. At the same time, the classes are only 50 minutes, so the actual class time is minimal. The lesson will have to be planned around this and students will have to be given time in the library to work before and after school and at lunch, in case they don’t have Internet access at home.

Planning with teachers is difficult because the library is open during lunch and before/after school - the times traditionally open for teachers to plan. The librarian has worked to overcome this obstacle by meeting with teachers during their planning periods, but obviously teachers have other things to do during this time as well. This particular lesson was planned in one 50-minute planning period, which is one reason why the librarian will not be co-teaching with the teacher in the library. The preliminary overview of the unit was all the collaboration that was possible.

Technology Skills, Resources, Hazards, and Needs
The Alice Deal computer lab is located adjacent to the library and houses 35 relatively new (3 years old) Apple computers. DCPS just received access to the EBSCO database, which makes research much easier. Students will be encouraged to use the database (these students have previously been in the library and had a lesson on how to use this, so a short review of how to search will suffice). This lesson would be very difficult without enough computers to accommodate every student in the class, given the level of Internet research required. Because of this fact, keeping in mind the potential for Internet outages or computer malfunctions is an important consideration, given how much of our lesson is online. There are two backup plans that have been developed:

1) Provide printout copies of the Facebook profile, so that students can at least begin building content offline. The reference and history books found in the library that apply will also be placed on hold behind the reference desk in case the Internet is not available for online research. Because these resources are so scant, this is not an ideal solution.
2) If the technical problem lasts more than one day, librarian and teacher will rearrange the unit order and teacher will cover background information prior to the social media lesson. (This would be a last resort, because the teacher’s preference is to do the social media project first).

In terms of computer use policies, Facebook itself is blocked, which is a potential problem. If students haven’t been exposed to the medium, they will not be able to view the site itself. The librarian will cover the basics of the site with a brief presentation featuring screenshots of sample profiles (including famous people, politicians, etc - people similar to historical figures students will use). In addition, using a fake Facebook wall template poses a problem in that students are unable to comment in the same way that they are in regular social media. The librarian will attempt to get around this by providing students access to a class google documents account. Students will share their document with their classmates and other students will be able to edit the documents with comments. Because Google Docs provides a list of edits and who made them, the librarian will be able to track changes in case a student deletes something posted by someone else.

The potential for ethical dilemmas in letting students use Facebook is somewhat avoided by using a fake “Facebook.” Still, students will be encouraged to think about the implications of what they’re putting on their site as part of the informal teaching that will occur as students are building their accounts. For example, what if George Washington had “checked in” at a battlefield before the fight took place? Could the enemy have guessed his positioning and won? The importance of privacy is implicitly addressed.

The students have pretty good technology skills, largely because of the economic makeup of the school’s population and the age of the students. This will help to bridge some gaps that may be present with the somewhat limited amount of class time.

The Materials and Technology Tools Needed
  • Computer Lab
    • There are 25 students in the class, so each student will have their own computer to work on during the library lessons. Students will also be able to use the library computers before and after school, and at lunch. The computer lab has a projector that will be used during the fourth lesson to project the profiles on the board for discussion.
  • Research Tools
    • History Textbook & class notes
      • Students will use the information they learned during their teacher’s introductory lesson on the time period, as well as information they have in their class textbook, as background information and a starting place. The notes and textbook will help them narrow down historical persons of interest to them. This review of classroom notes will refresh the students’ memories and provide some repetition with the information to assist in the process of learning the material.
    • Historical websites
      • __http://www.ushistory.org/__
        • “The Independence Hall Association (IHA) was founded in 1942 to spearhead the creation of Independence National Historical Park. The IHA owns the website ushistory.org, which supports our mission to educate the public about the Revolutionary and Colonial eras of American history, as well as Philadelphia generally.” -Overseen by IHA, as part of NPS
      • __http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html__
        • “American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning.” -Overseen by Library of Congress
      • __http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/chrono.asp#18__
        • “The Avalon Project will mount digital documents relevant to the fields of Law, History, Economics, Politics, Diplomacy and Government. We do not intend to mount only static text but rather to add value to the text by linking to supporting documents expressly referred to in the body of the text.”-Overseen by Yale Law Library
      • __http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/__
        • This website is maintained and run by the White House. It contains vital information about the government, the White House, presidents, first ladies, and American history.
      • __http://www.theamericanrevolution.org/people.aspx__
        • This site “works with schools and universities regularly to deliver the content that they require to support their lesson plans and curriculum. Thousands of educational institutions link to TheAmericanRevolution.Org and the site received close to 3 million unique visitors in 2009. It is committed to helping in the education and awareness of The American Revolution for both children and adults.”
  • Class Google Documents Site
    • All students’ will have a document on the homepage for their fake Facebook profile, allowing students to comment on the “wall” without exposing them to an actual social media site, open to everyone.
  • Fake Facebook profile templates































  • Graphic Organizers
    • Initial Research
      • Students will identify facts about three of the figures off of the list provided by the classroom teacher. They will use this information to choose their historical figure. (Students will list their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choice and hand in this information to the librarian. The librarian will then assign each student a character to be announced in the second lesson).
    • Character Profile
      • The students will use this graphic organizer to identify information about their historical figure such as: important dates, spouse & children, contributions to America, related figures, and personal information. This information will be used to set up a Facebook page.

The Implementation & Assignments
As mentioned, this three-day lesson takes place at the beginning of a three-week unit on the 18th century American Revolution period. The classroom teacher and the librarian will meet to discuss what the students will know coming into the social media/library lessons and what will be covered after the lessons. More than anything, the social media lessons are designed to peak students’ interest and to give them basic information on the historical figures that will appear throughout the rest of the unit. In addition, the discussions about the influence of social media and its purpose will inform the later lessons on the free press during the Revolutionary period.

The first lesson in the library (following the students’ introduction to the period in the classroom) will cover basic information on the important historical figures of the time and Web research skills. After a brief overview of the sites identified by the librarian as useful research tools and a refresher of how to use the EBSCO database, students will fill out a graphic organizer (see Appendix 1) on their choice of two of the historical figures on the list provided by the classroom teacher (see Appendix 2). Students will rank three historical figures according to their preference of who to study and will turn this and the graphic organizer into the librarian. Assessment will be given on the completion of the graphic organizer. Although the librarian will not grade the actual information, she will look for accurate and complete information, as well as cited sources, to evaluate whether the lesson was successful.

On the second day of the three-day unit chunk, students will be assigned their chosen historical figure. The librarian will provide students with the password and username information for the class Google Docs account (see Appendix 3) and will go over the basics of editing documents. Students will already see their characters’ Facebook profile documents (added by the librarian) (see Appendix 4). Librarian will also go over the information needed for the profile. This information is also included on a graphic organizer that will be distributed to the students (see Appendix 5). Students will then have the rest of the period to start playing with their profile, attempting to add a photo, information, etc. The students’ homework will be to do Web research on their home computer or in the library before school and at lunch before the next class. They should have a complete graphic organizer before the next class begins. Assessment from Day 2 will be on this graphic organizer, which will be graded by the classroom teacher for information accuracy.

The third day of the lesson will be devoted to filling out the online profiles. The librarian will also conduct a lesson on social media etiquette and the importance of remaining in character through interaction with others, what your character chooses to like and who they are friends with. The librarian will make sample posts to demonstrate the technology to students. Their homework from this day will be a requirement to comment on at least three other students’ profiles, in a simulation of writing on their Facebook wall. Students should also comment on their own profile as a simulated status update. These online requirements can be fulfilled at home or in the library before/after school and at lunch. Assessment for this day will occur on day four, when the class discusses the social media interactions.

The fourth day of the lesson will be discussion based. Students will be encouraged to discuss difficulties with the project and how they attempted to stay in character. The librarian will show examples of postings to encourage students to discuss the types of conversations that occurred. The librarian will also pose questions such as “What might have the existence of social media during this time period have changed?” Privacy will be mentioned: “What if George Washington had posted his location when he was at war…would the enemy have been able to see this?” Assessment of days 3 and 4 will be based on the interactions between the students online and in person. Were they involved? Did they post the required number of times? Were their posting accurate with regard to their characters?

The rest of the unit (the following three weeks) will be based in the students’ classroom. The teacher will cover textbook information and standards required for testing. If the students show interest, the continuation of the social media project is possible, through continued monitoring of the librarian.

The Lessons
General Lesson Plan Information
Librarians
Kendra Parsons, Walter Rodgers, Natalie Greene
School/Location
Alice Deal Middle School; DC Public Schools
Grade
8th Grade
Library Context
Four lessons in a larger unit; Begins on day 2 of unit
Collaboration Continuum
Coordination/Collaboration
Content/Unit
1721-1787 American history; “A New Nation”
Estimated Lesson Time
Four days of 50-minute lessons
Learner Characteristics and Implications to Lesson
School is made up of approximately 900 students with a racial/ethnic composition of 44% African American, 37% Caucasian, 11% Hispanic, and 7% Asian. 29% of the students receive free or reduced lunch. While they have not reached their AYP targets the past two years, they did pass the DC CAS assessment. This particular class is a regular 8th grade social studies class, made up of 25 students. While a couple of students have IEPs, these will be accommodated through more hands-on instruction during class. Students are also encouraged to come into the library during outside of class time. The students in this class are all relatively technologically savvy and most have Internet access at home.

Day One Lesson Plan
Instructional Objectives
  • Students will understand basics of web research and database use
  • Students will know at least two historical figures that can be used in these lessons
  • Students will identify the historical figure they want to impersonate during the lessons
Standards
DCPS Content Standards
  • Identify the political and economic causes and consequences of the American Revolution and the major battles, leaders, and events that led to a final peace (e.g., free press, taxation without representation).

21st Century Learning Standards
  • 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning.
  • 1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
  • 1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
  • 1.1.6 Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning.
  • 2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
  • 2.1.3 Use strategies to draw conclusions from information and apply knowledge to curricular areas, real world situations, and further investigations.
  • 2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
Lesson (Step-by-Step)
  1. Librarian will give an overview of the next four days of lessons.
  2. Librarian will give a brief lesson on sites identified as useful research tools, as well as a refresher of how to use the EBSCO database
  3. Librarian will pass out the general graphic organizer (see Appendix 1).
  4. Students will fill this out using web-based research with information on their choice of two of the historical figures on the list provided by the classroom teacher (see Appendix 2).
  5. Students will rank three historical figures according to their preference of who to study and will turn this and the graphic organizer into the librarian.
Justification for Choice of Instructional Strategies
Librarian will offer both lecture and hands-on instruction as part of this lesson, in order to accommodate different learning styles. Assessment is informal, but will give a good picture of whether students got the information or not.
Resources for Students
  • Websites (see list under Materials section in unit plan)
  • Books from library (limited)
  • Student textbook
  • EBSCO database
List of resources used in the lesson
  • Graphic Organizer #1
  • List of historical figures provided by teacher
  • Websites
  • EBSCO Database
Justification of resources used
  • Websites have been vetted for accuracy. Students have limited research time, so a pathfinder list of resources was chosen to help aid this process.
  • EBSCO is a district-funded resource that will be invaluable, especially considering the lack of books availalbe in the school’s library
Assessment
Assessment will be given on the completion of the graphic organizer. Although the librarian will not grade the actual information, she will look for accurate and complete information, as well as cited sources, to evaluate whether the lesson was successful.


Day Two Lesson Plan
Instructional Objectives
  • Students will understand how Google Documents works, including how to comment, how to upload a picture, how to edit and add information, and how to log in.
  • Students will understand the requirements of the graphic organizer for their profile and will be able to research using the web to fill in answers.
Standards
21st Century Learning Standards
  • 1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.
  • 2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
  • 2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
  • 2.1.6 Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.
  • 2.3.1 Connect understanding to the real world.
Lesson (Step-by-Step)
  1. Students are assigned their chosen historical figure.
  2. The librarian will provide students with the password and username information for the class Google Docs account (see Appendix 3) and will go over the basics of editing documents.
  3. Students will already see their characters’ Facebook profile documents (added by the librarian) (see Appendix 4).
  4. Librarian will go over the information needed for the profile. This information is also included on a graphic organizer that will be distributed to the students (see Appendix 5).
  5. Students will then have the rest of the period to start playing with their profile, attempting to add a photo, information, etc.
  6. The librarian will assign the students’ homework, which will be to do Web research on their home computer or in the library before school and at lunch before the next class. They should have a complete graphic organizer before the next class begins.
Justification for Choice of Instructional Strategies
Librarian will demonstrate the Google Documents and then let students try it out, incorporating the technology into the lesson, but allowing students to play around with it as well.
Resources for Students
  • Print materials (limited)
  • Websites
  • Databases
List of resources used in the lesson
  • Google Docs accounts
  • Computers
  • EBSCO Database
  • Websites
  • Graphic Organizer #2
Justification of resources used
Google Docs has been used to accommodate the privacy needs of students. While Facebook is a great tool for communicating, because of the limitations of the school environment, a simulated account needed to be established. Google Docs provides collaboration without the need to use a real social media site. It will also be useful to these particular students, because they will likely need collaboration tools in the future. (The IB curriculum in particular emphasizes group work).
Assessment
The librarian will collect the second graphic organizers (Appendix 5) on day three. This will be graded by the classroom teacher for information accuracy and whether they included a reputable citation. The librarian will be available to help with the latter requirement if needed.


Day Three Lesson Plan
Instructional Objectives
  • Students will use information gathered from the web to interact on a mock-social media platform.
  • Students will recognize the way that the medium drives research and interaction.
  • Students will gain an appreciation of their historical figure in a more personal manner through friends and status updates.
Standards
DCPS Content Standards
  • Students understand the major events preceding the founding of the nation and relate their significance to the development of American constitutional democracy.
  • Identify the political and economic causes and consequences of the American Revolution and the major battles, leaders, and events that led to a final peace (e.g., free press, taxation without representation).


21st Century Learning Standards
  • 1.1.1 Follow an inquiry based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects, and make the real world connection for using this process in own life.
  • 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning.
  • 1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
  • 1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
  • 1.1.6 Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning.
  • 1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
  • 1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.
  • 1.1.9 Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding.
  • 2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
  • 2.1.3 Use strategies to draw conclusions from information and apply knowledge to curricular areas, real world situations, and further investigations.
  • 2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
  • 2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.
  • 2.1.6 Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.
  • 2.3.1 Connect understanding to the real world.
Lesson (Step-by-Step)
  1. Librarian will collect homework (graphic organizers for the profiles), check them off against a list, and then return them to students so they can begin building the profile.
  2. Librarian will conduct a short lesson on social media etiquette, including privacy standards, spelling and language issues, and anti-bullying standards.
  3. Librarian will offer example of a profile (see George Washington profile under unit plan materials). She will emphasize need to stay in character through interaction with others, what your character chooses to like and who they are friends with.
  4. Students will spend the rest of the time filling out their profiles.
  5. Their homework from this day will be a requirement to comment on at least three other students’ profiles, in a simulation of writing on their Facebook wall. Students should also comment on their own profile as a simulated status update. These online requirements can be fulfilled at home or in the library before/after school and at lunch.
Justification for Choice of Instructional Strategies
Students will have the opportunity to practice the technology in a classroom setting, where they have a teacher and classmates to help with any difficulties. Research tools are also available.
Resources for Students
  • Online collaboration tool (Google Docs)
  • Databases
  • Websites
  • Print Materials (limited)
List of resources used in the lesson
  • Google Docs accounts
  • Fake Facebook profiles
  • Websites
  • EBSCO Database
Justification of resources used
Google Docs has been used to accommodate the privacy needs of students. While Facebook is a great tool for communicating, because of the limitations of the school environment, a simulated account needed to be established. Google Docs provides collaboration without the need to use a real social media site. It will also be useful to these particular students, because they will likely need collaboration tools in the future. (The IB curriculum in particular emphasizes group work). Commenting in particular is easy to do on Google Docs.
Assessment
Librarian will observe postings during the fourth lesson to account for how well students stayed in character (informal assessment). Librarian will also provide a list of the students and if they fulfilled the posting requirements to the teacher for grading.

Appendix 1 Graphic Organizer on historical figures

Student Name:

Name of Historical Figure #1:
Dates Born and Died

Occupation (choose one if there are more than that)

Main location during life

Other historical figures he or she knew

Marital status and name of spouse, if there was one


Name of Historical Figure #2:
Dates Born and Died

Occupation (choose one if there were more than one)

Main location during life

Other historical figures he or she knew

Marital status and name of spouse, if there was one


Appendix 2 Classroom Teachers’ List of historical figures (30)

  1. John Adams
  2. Abigail Adams
  3. Benedict Arnold
  4. Crispus Attucks
  5. King George III
  6. Richard Henry Lee
  7. Paul Revere
  8. Thomas Jefferson
  9. John Hancock
  10. Patrick Henry
  11. Molly Pitcher
  12. Thomas Paine
  13. Betsy Ross
  14. Mercy Otis Warren
  15. Deborah Sampson
  16. Phyllis Wheatley
  17. Martha Washington
  18. Lord Charles Cornwallis
  19. Casimir Pulaski
  20. Cybil Ludington
  21. Samuel Adams
  22. Benjamin Franklin
  23. Nathanael Greene
  24. Daniel Morgan
  25. John Andre
  26. John Dickinson
  27. John Askin
  28. William Allen
  29. John Jay
  30. Mary Draper


Appendix 3 Google Docs Information
[These are proposed; the Google Doc has not actually been created]
Username: LibrariansSocialStudiesProject
Password: GeorgeWashington


Appendix 4 Fake Facebook profile

external image wa08p_XTEKD4PsyJAVAItSnDS0c7_lNU6CT7mjvHdmsGz2dVfhDcibrz-TMAEUyEzMY30MuWiQQLpiHXnt51DgQaq4EJ1oIZ9VMgfjv23DSSw9llpnM


Appendix 5 Graphic Organizer on specific figure

Student Name:

Item to be added to profile
Information
Citation
1) Photo of Historical Figure


2) Name of Historical Figure


3) Networks


4) Relationship Status


5) Birthday


6) Hometown


7) Where he/she has traveled


8) Friends


9) Groups


10) Education and Work


11) Potential wall posts or status updates


12) Additional Information



Sources

American Association for School Libraries. (2007). Standards for the 21st century learner. Accessed online from
__http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf__

District of Columbia Public Schools. (2011). Deal middle school. Accessed online from
__http://profiles.dcps.dc.gov/Deal+Middle+School__

District of Columbia Public Schools. (2009). Teaching & learning standards. __http://www.dc.gov/downloads/TEACHING%20&%20LEARNING/Learning%20Standards%202009/DCPS-SOCSTUD-GRADE08-STANDARD-LEARNING-ACTIVITIES.pdf__

Greenhow, C. & Robelia, B. (2009). Old communication, new literacies: Social network sites as social learning resources. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14. 1120-1161. Accessed online from
__http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10323494/2009%20greenhow.pdf__

Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., & Zickuhr, K. (2010, Feb 3). Social media & mobile internet use among teens and young adults. Pew Research Center. Accessed online from
__http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1516/millennials-panel-two-millennials-media-information__

Millenials, media, and information. (2010, Feb 24). Pew Research Center.
__http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1484/social-media-mobile-internet-use-teens-millennials-fewer-blog__



Waddell, D. (2011). Historical facebook lesson. Accessed online from
http://docs.google.com/previewtemplate?id=1-nCxDCLcEAuge4wac5I5F_83GH9QNZpXpKCGMRl2utk