Project Members
Rachel Heller and Jess Garman

Introduction

Our project is designed to help junior and senior art history students gain a deeper understanding of an artist of their choosing and how their life story influenced their art making through a group technology project. As our readings suggest, “A growing body of scholarship suggests potential benefits of these forms of participatory culture, including opportunities for peer-to-peer learning, a changed attitude toward intellectual property, the diversification of cultural expression, the development of skills valued in the modern workplace, and a more empowered conception of citizenship” (Jenkins, 3). In this lesson, students are asked to pick any artist and develop an interview script that will discuss how the artist’s life influenced their art. Then, each pair will be recording their interviews in the form of a podcast. Students will be graded on content, quality and creativity.

Throughout the project, the students collaborate with one another and work in teams to choose an artist that has influenced or moved them, research that artist’s life, pick a period of time in the artist’s life and develop interview questions that will explain how their life influenced their art making. The purpose of this assignment is to give the students an opportunity to put their research into practice and turn an important figure in art history, into a three-dimensional person for the class through technology. Over the course of the project, the teacher and media specialist will help the students come up with probing questions to inspire deeper research and critical thinking.

The media specialist plays a central role in this lesson through co-designing, co-teaching and co-assessing the student’s final projects. The unit is designed to be a culminating experience to wrap up a year of Art History studies. Due to the part-time nature of most of the faculty at the Baltimore School for the Arts, technology will be utilized by the teacher and the media specialist to collaboratively plan and organize the lessons. Students at the Baltimore School for the Arts also have access to a wide array of technology, with laptops they can check out, wireless Internet available throughout the building and no restrictions on their Internet usage at school. While not in class, students will take advantage of their technology access by using the class Wiki to communicate with one another daily and give feedback and tips to one another as they work through their interview podcasts.

Jess and Rachel designed this project because we felt that the technology enhanced the lesson in a meaningful way. Students are taking a historical figure in art, researching that figure and working in teams to develop an interview that will bring their artist to life using 21st Century technology skills in a familiar and very current format – the podcast. Students will then have the option of sharing their podcasts with the world by posting them to the Internet. At each step of the way, technology has been infused into the lesson. The media specialist will use a SMART Board to play the sample podcasts; in addition, the teacher will use it for giving an introduction to the lesson.Students will use the computers to start their brainstorming and post their project information to the class wiki. Audacity will be used to record and edit their podcasts and they will learn about verbal citations and use Archive.org to find copyright free sounds clips to enhance their final projects. Finally, students will have a rubric to accompany each lesson so that they can see how they will be assessed.

The following unit plan includes three lessons, as well as AASL’s 21st Century Learning standards. The setting and context of the school and the students who are participating in the unit, the materials needed and the sequence of implementation are also included below.

The Topic & Standards

Topic:

It is a collaborative effort of the art history and the library media specialist to increase the students’ understanding of a specific artist and their influence on art history. The students will explore the character of an artist to create a interview where they will focus which factors from their life influenced their art. Ultimately, it is important that the students identify with the artist and bring to their interview a thoughtful interpretation of the time period, specific aspect and knowledge of the artist’s influence on the history of art.



Standards:

The project focuses on fulfilling the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner.

http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/standards



American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner

Standard 1:
The students will learn how to effectively and ethically search for information. It is important that they critically analyze any sources and they legally locate the various resources. They are particularly becoming comfortable with using the databases. The project requires the students to find a variety of sources, from print to electronic, and work in different formats with the podcasts. They also will be choosing the artist and refining the research to create a coherent final project and to find more sources. In addition, students will be continually commenting on other students’ projects throughout the lessons.

1.1.3. - Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.4 - Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.1.5 - Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
1.1.8. Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.
1.2.3. - Demonstrate creativity by using multiple resources and formats.
1.2.4. Maintain a critical stance by question the validity and accuracy of all information.
1.2.5. Demonstrate adaptability by changing inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achieve success.
1.3.3 Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information.
1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community.
1.4.2 Use interaction and feedback from teachers and peers to guide own inquiry process.

Standard 2:

Students not only are finding information, but they must learn to critically analyze the sources and identify bias or other slant. They will use a wiki to organize all of their ideas and research notes. There is a section for an annotated bibliography where they must explain the reasons for using a particular source. Throughout the process, the students are respectfully and efficiently working with their team members to create the project. In addition, the final podcast incorporates writing with acquiring new technological skills.

2.1.1 Continue an inquiry-based research process by applying critical thinking skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluate, organization) to information and knowledge in order to construct new understandings, draw conclusions, and create new knowledge.
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.
2.1.6. - Use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings.

Standard 3

Students will use the class wiki forum for giving feedback. The teacher and the media specialist will use the wiki as well as in class guidance to help the students. The podcast is a culmination of writing a interview script, recording the interview, editing the clips and sharing with the class. Each of these steps requires teamwork, attention to detail and a knowledge of art.

3.1.1 Conclude an inquiry-based research process by sharing new understandings and reflecting on the learning
3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.
3.1.3 Use writing and speaking skills to communicate new understandings effectively
3.1.4. Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
3.1.6 Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.
3.2.1 Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal situations.
3.2.3 Demonstrate teamwork by working productively with others.

The Setting and Context

1. What kind of school or library is this? Why does this matter to your lesson?

Our project will take place in the library of the Baltimore School for the Arts (BSFA). The BSFA is a 9-12 high school with a mission to provide students who aspire to a career in the arts with intensive, pre-professional training combined with a rigorous, college preparatory curriculum. The BSFA is a free, public school located in the heart of Baltimore City, Maryland.

The setting is especially important to our lesson because art history is taken very seriously at the BSFA and there is a huge emphasis on making sure that the students have an appreciation for the history of the arts that they are mastering.


2. What kind of students, and what are their learning needs?

The student body is incredibly diverse because they accept students based solely on their auditions, meaning acceptance has nothing to do with grades. Auditions occur once per year in January and include students interested in majoring in Music, Dance, Theatre or Visual Arts. Students may audition at anytime throughout their high school career. In 2010, Baltimore School for the Arts had fifteen students for every full-time equivalent teacher and had a total of 370 students. They ranked in the 95th percentile or above in all subject areas tested for MSA Standard approval and in 2010, BSFA had 35% of students eligible for free or reduced price lunch programs.

Their learning needs are varied, because they will be coming to our course from all different art concentrations. However, since they will be juniors and seniors, they have had at least one technology class.

3. Will you be teaching this yourself, or working with a teacher? What are the challenges of either scenario?

We will be working with the Art History teacher on this lesson. She will present the project and will explain that the students are allowed to pick artists from all disciplines and all countries. She will give them some ideas and examples and the Media Specialist will compile a pathfinder to help the students locate information and explore various artists. In addition, the Media Specialist and the teacher will work together to come up with some example podcasts as models for the students’ projects. (ex. Terri gross, This American Life etc.) We will work together to inspire the students to get excited and creative with their podcasts!

The challenges of working with the teacher are definitely mostly schedule related, because the art history teacher is part time at the BSFA, it may be difficult to find the time to meet with her and discuss our lessons. We will jump this hurtle by taking advantage of technology – as a group, we have created a Google Document that will enable us to Skype or talk on the phone outside of class time to work on this lesson

4. Are there scheduling challenges that affect how you plan the lessons, and when the classes will occur? Do the scheduling challenges affect when and how you will plan with other teachers?

Yes, most of the teachers at the BSFA are part-time which makes it very difficult to collaborate. The Art History professor uses the Media Center frequently to gain insight into the appropriate resources she can use for her lessons. This project will be a great opportunity to work together to teach the students a new technology and bring them into the library. Because the Media Center does not have any fixed classes, it should not be an issue to schedule class time in the library to use the computers.

5. What are the technology skills of the students and the teachers? How do you plan to work around these considerations?

The technology skills of the students and teachers are high; most of them by eleventh and twelvth grade have had many design classes using Adobe software and have done many research projects for their academic classes. They also have all taken at least one Technology class. Those that feel uncomfortable will be encouraged to partner with a more confident technology user.

6. What are the level of resources that you have? Number of computers? Internet access? Mobile devices? etc etc. How does the level of technology access you have link to how you're implementing your lessons?

The Media Center at the BSFA is home to about 12,000 books, CD’s, DVD’s and scores. Because of BSFA’s special focus, the library requires many specialized materials and includes thousands of acting edition scripts, videos, laptops, hundreds of scores and CD’s for instrumentalists and vocalists. There are also books for visual artists seeking ideas and inspiration as well as a large electronic database collection (ProQuest, SIRS, Historical Newspapers, Science Resource Center etc. which the students can access from home). In addition, there is print reference section and a small collection of literature, history, science and math to supplement their academic work. Conveniently, any fiction that cannot be found in the LMC’s small fiction collection can most likely be found at the Enoch Pratt Library’s main branch located two blocks from the BSFA.

In terms of technology, students have access to 20 laptops, about 15 I-Pad’s, 20 cameras, 18 computers in the library and WiFi all over campus. Because the BSFA is a charter school, they are not required and do not have any blocks on their Internet usage.

The level of technology we have access to can enhance our lesson because there are no restrictions in place. The students are allowed to access via the Web; this gives students the freedom to use any web-sites and resources to develop their interviews and create their final podcasts.

7. What kind of policy challenges will you face? Are certain sites blocked? Will certain projects (for example social media projects) pose professional/ethical concerns? How will you get around these?
As stated above, there are no restrictions on Internet usage at the school and no foreseeable professional/ethical concerns other than plagiarism of audio clips. The media specialist will address this topic in the lessons.

8. What about technology failures (i.e. a site is down, a computer is offline etc.). How will you plan for these possibilities?
If Audacity is down on instruction day, we will plan by having a backup program such as, HipCast, Evoca, or Propoganda. If the server is down on our scheduled lesson day we will either reschedule or connect to the Enoch Pratt Library’s wireless Internet with the library’s laptops.

9. Think of other contexts that apply to your specific scenario.
You could use this lesson as part of a college Art History class or a summer art history workshop/seminar.


The Materials and Technology Tools You will Need

SMART Board
The media specialist will use a SMART Board to play the sample podcasts; in addition, the teacher will use it for giving an introduction to the lesson.

Sample Podcasts
The media specialist will have two sample podcasts to show the students. These will give the students an understanding of the final goal and the steps necessary for completing the project.

Computers with Internet for all students
Students will use the computers to start their brainstorming and post their project information to the class wiki.

Audacity
Students will use Audacity to record and edit their podcasts.

Archive.org
Students will use this copyright free music site to get sound clips to enhance their podcasts.

Headphones and Microphones
Students will use headsets to record their podcast interviews.

Class Wiki
Students will use the class wiki to post their first ideas and then comment on their classmates projects.


The Implementation & Assignments

The podcast project would be a culmination of an eleventh or twelfth level art history class. This will be their final project where they are required to use their knowledge of artists and their work to create a unique perspective on a particular artist’s life. The teacher and the library media specialist will provide guidance to the students, but also encourage them to independently explore and create a view. These students have a firm grasp on the basics of art history and are familiar with the important time periods as well as having specific interests towards certain artists. The research is focused on online databases and museum databases, while they must also include some prints sources. The final product will be a podcast interview of the artist discussing a particular time period in their life and how that relates to the rest of their career. Students will be in groups of two with one student playing the artist and the other playing the interviewer. Throughout their project, students will post their progress on the wiki. Each group will have its own page, which includes brainstorming ideas, research notes, and an annotated bibliography. At the end of each day, the teacher, students and media specialist post comments, questions and/or suggestions on each group’s site. The students will gain insight into providing constructive feedback to their peers. Ultimately, the students will gain critical thinking skills in analyzing sources and a deeper understanding of artists’ lives through utilizing technological literacy.

Day 1 – Students are introduced to the podcast project by the teacher. Then the Media Specialist will show them an example of a good podcast interview. The students will then divide themselves into pairs. Each pair will be asked to figure out which artist they want to focus on for their interview by the next class.

Day 2 - The students will have chosen their artists. The Media Specialst will then demonstrate how to use the different databases. The students will research and brainstorm a period in their chosen artist’s life that they would like to focus on in their podcast interviews. At the end of the day, the students will write on the Wiki about their projects so far and fellow students will write comments and suggestions.

Day 3 – The Media Specialist will review some of the museum website databases. The students will be working on an annotated bibliography surrounding their chosen artist. Students will again comment on one another’s progress at the end of the day on the class wiki.

Day 4 – . The Media Specialist will use the SMART Board to demonstrate how to effectively use Audacity to create their podcasts. The Media Specialist will then briefly go over how to verbally cite an audio file at the end of their podcasts. The teacher will hand each group headsets and microphones. The students will begin practicing recording their podcasts. Students will again comment on one another’s progress at the end of the day on the class wiki.

Day 5 – We finish up the week with the students continuing to practice and edit their podcasts. Over the weekend the students will be asked to make more substantial comments on their peer’s podcasts to help them make final revisions before they present next week.

Day 6- Students will make final revisions, recordings and edits of their podcast interviews.

Day 7 & 8 - Students will present their podcast interviews to the class. Following the interviews, students will be asked to fill out peer evaluation forms.

The Lessons

Three Lessons

Lesson 1: Introduction to Artists and Example Podcasts
Day 1

Objectives:
Students will:
  1. Gain an overall understanding of the project’s goals through watching examples and demonstrations.
  2. Decide on an artist and divide up into pairs to form the groups.
  3. Learn how to narrow the artist’s career into specific topics for the focus of the interview.
  4. Have a firm grasp on how to utilize the class wiki.

Tools:
  • SMART Board
  • Sample podcast interviews
  • Computers with access to internet and databases
  • Class wiki

Procedures:
1. Teacher will introduce the project and explain to the students overall format of the unit. Include in this explanation, the schedule, and the goals. Make sure the students know that the media specialist and the teacher will be working together and provide a description of the two roles. The media specialist will then show example podcast interviews on the SMART Board

2. Then the teacher will provide examples of artists, such as Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, and Gustav Klimt. In addition, the teacher will lead a discussion about possible topics from the artist’s lives which would lend themselves to interview questions. Throughout this session, the teacher will record the students’ ideas on the board.

3. The teacher will then give the students 15-20 minutes for the to choose partners and artists. In the groups, they are to brainstorm possible topics and narrow to three choices for their research. At the end of the time, the class will come back together and will share their artists and topics with the rest of the class.

4. The media specialist will then introduce the class wiki and demonstrate how the students will input the information and comment on each other’s projects. Students will then create their own wiki page and input their choices. They will also each post at least one comment on the other groups’ topics.

Standards:
This introductory lesson will help students decide on their artist and refine several topics into one specific for the podcast interview. In addition to the media specialist and the teacher, other students will actively participate in class discussion of topics and provide feedback for their classmates. By the end of the class, the students will choose groups and demonstrate their ability to work as a team in exchanging and refining their project ideas.

American Association for School Librarians
1.1.3. Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community.
1.4.2 Use interaction and feedback from teachers and peers to guide own inquiry process.
3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.
3.2.3 Demonstrate teamwork by working productively with others.

Rubric: Lesson 1

If a student does not participate or finish one of these topics, he or she will not receive any points.
Topic
Exemplery (10)
Partially Proficient (7)
Unacceptable (4)
Points
Class Discussion
Actively engaged in discussion, offering thoughtful comments and questions
Offer two or fewer comments.
Offers two or fewer comments that do not connect with the topic
/10
Topics
Three focal topics with at least two possible interview questions
Three broad topics with one or fewer interview question
Three broad topics without interview questions
/10
Class comments
1 or more constructive comments, questions, or suggestions per group
1 or more broad, not constructive comments per group
Skip two or more groups
/10
Total



30

Lesson 2: Research Sources and Methods

Days 2 and 3:

Objectives
Students will:
  1. Effectively devise and then refine a period in the artist’s life that will guide their research.
  2. Have a firm grasp on how to locate relevant information using a variety of sources, including, online databases (periodicals and encyclopedias), books, and websites. However, the focus will be assessing scholarly articles from the online databases.
  3. Create interview questions that demonstrate their understanding of how their relates to the artist’s overall career.
  4. Formulate their interview questions in preparation for the podcast recording.

Tools/Materials:
  • SMART Board
  • Computers with access to the internet and school databases
  • Print sources: books and periodicals
  • Museum website resources.
  • Information sheet with tips and instructions for using the online databases.
  • Class wiki
  • Resources/Note taking

Procedures
Day 2:

1. Student groups will choose their artist and begin formulating their research questions. At this point, they may have several time periods, but ultimately, there should only be one to find the targeted information. They will have these questions in mind when the Media Specialist describes the various resources.

2. The Media Specialist will use the SMART Board to demonstrate how to effectively find information using online databases. The instruction will focus on the specific databases and how to efficiently find the targeted information. These databases will include: JSTOR, Art Full Text, Art History Image Database, and Oxford Art Online. The Media Specialist will hand out the information sheet with hints on using the different sources.

3. Students will start their research using the databases. The media specialist and teacher will circulate among the students to answer questions and offer suggestions. They are required to use at least five articles from the databases for their project.

4. Students will begin creating questions for the final interview and post all of their sources to a class wiki. They must annotate each source and provide the relevance to their project, including whether it is a primary or secondary source.

5. At the end of the day, have students report on their progress and their possible interview questions. The teacher and the media specialist will address any questions that may be relevant to the entire class.

6. Groups will read the other students projects on the wiki and post advice or questions. In addition, the teacher will also add his/her own suggestions.

Day 3:

1. The groups will review their topics/questions and make any adjustments, taking into account the comments/suggestions from their classmates and teacher. Students will continue to refine and develop questions for the interview.

2. Media specialist will review some museum websites. These will include: National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, and Smithsonian American Art Museum. Students can also find their own museums, but they must find at least two articles/pages relevant to their topics.

3. At the end of the day, students will have an annotated bibliography and pointed questions for their interview.

4. Teacher and students will again critique their classmates progress and offer suggestions.

Standards:

This research lesson plan is crafted to address the American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learners. Students will use the research process and their understanding of databases to practice and refine the following skills. Groups will work together to communicate and formulate advanced knowledge of their topics and artists.

American Association of School Librarians

1.1.3. Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding.
1.1.4 - Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions.
1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
1.1.8. Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.
1.2.3. - Demonstrate creativity by using multiple resources and formats.
1.2.4. Maintain a critical stance by question the validity and accuracy of all information.
1.2.5. Demonstrate adaptability by changing inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achieve success.
1.3.3 Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information.
1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community.
1.4.2 Use interaction and feedback from teachers and peers to guide own inquiry process.

2.1.1 Continue an inquiry-based research process by applying critical thinking skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluate, organization) to information and knowledge in order to construct new understandings, draw conclusions, and create new knowledge.
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.

3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.
3.1.4. Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
3.1.6 Use information and technology ethically and responsibly
3.2.3 Demonstrate teamwork by working productively with others.

NETS Standards:

2 - Communication and Collaboration: Students:
  • d: contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

6 - Technology Operations and Concepts: Students:
  • a: understand and use technology systems.
  • b: select and use applications effectively and productively.
  • c: troubleshoot systems and applications.
  • d: transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.

Rubric: Lesson 2
Topic
Target (10 pts)
Acceptable

(7 pts)
Not acceptable

(4 pt)
Total points
Number of Sources
5 Online database articles

2 Museum database articles

2 books

2 websites
4 online database articles

1 museum database

1 book

1 website
3 or fewer online databases

1 or 2 of the following: museum, book, website
10
Interview Questions
3 or more open-ended questions that the artist answers in 3 or more complex sentences.
3 three or more open ended questions with fewer than three sentences per answer.
Fewer than 3 open ended questions, with fewer than three sentences per answer.
10
Organization of Research
3-5 research notes in at least three interview questions
Fewer than 3 research notes in at least three interview questions
No research notes per question
10
Annotations on Bibliography
Detailed annotation for at least 7 sources, including:

- relevance to topic/question

- credibility

- any bias
Detail annotation 5-6 sources.
Detailed annotation for fewer than 5 sources
10
Comments on Classmates’ projects
2-3 constructive comments,

questions,

or suggestions per group
1 constructive comment per group, or skip 2 groups
No constructive comments OR skip more than 2 groups
10











Lesson 3: How to Create & Edit a Podcast

Days 3, 4, & 5

Participants:Art History Teacher, library media specialist, 11th & 12th grade teachers

Objectives:
Students will:

1: Student teams will use Audacity to record a podcast interview based on the life of their chosen artist.

2: Students will learn how to ethically use recorded information by learning how to properly cite audio sources in their podcast interviews.

Tools/Materials:
  • SMART Boards
  • Computers with access to the internet and school databases
  • Scripts
  • Audacity
  • Headphones
  • Microphones

Procedures

Activation

The Media Specialist will ask “What makes a good podcast?” Which should lead to a short discussion that by the end of the students should understand that: music, sound clips, and careful editing enhance a good podcast. Next, the teacher will play podcast examples for class.

Direct Instruction

1: The teacher will explain that we will be creating podcasts of interviews where one partner will be a reporter and the other will be a chosen famous artist in history. The purpose will be a forum for the partners to create and demonstrate their knowledge of the artist’s life and how their life informs/informed their work.

2. The Media Specialist will use the SMART Board to demonstrate how to effectively use Audacity to create their podcasts. The instruction will focus on the various techniques and tools that they can use to edit their recordings. The teacher will then hand out a sheet with reminders on how to cut, paste, record and turn their files into WAVs using Audacity.

3. The Media Specialist will then briefly go over how to verbally cite an audio file at the end of their podcasts. She will also show them some examples of final credits at the end of podcast interviews and direct them to archive.org and copyright free source that they can download music to enhance their podcasts with.

4. The teacher will then hand out the microphones and headsets.

5. Students will then begin practicing recording their podcasts with Audacity. They will likely need two class sessions to complete their podcasts and the teacher and Media Specialist have reserved time for them to do so.

Part 2:

1. Students will continue practicing and editing their podcast interviews. The Media Specialist and teacher will be available to help any groups having trouble.

2. Groups will share and listen to the other students projects on the wiki and post advice or questions. In addition, the teacher and Media Specialist will add his/her feedback.

3. The groups will review their feedback from the wiki and make any adjustments, taking into account the comments/suggestions from their classmates and teacher. Students will continue to refine and develop their podcasts.

4: Students will go back and cite any audio sources that were borrowed from a copyright protected source.

Part 3: Day 3/4:

5: Students will present their completed podcasts to the class
6. Teacher and students will again critique their classmates progress and offer suggestions.
Peer evaluation


Standards:

This podcast lesson plan is crafted to address the American Association of School Librarians and the Maryland State Standards. Students will use their understanding of Audacity to practice and refine the following skills. Groups will work together to communicate and formulate advanced knowledge of their topics and artists through their podcast interviews.

American Association of School Librarians


1.1.9 - Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding.
· Work with partners to develop and refine their podcast interviews to authentically communicate the significance of the artist’s life and work.

1.2.3. - Demonstrate creativity by using multiple resources and formats.
  • Students will draw on multiple sources to enhance their podcasts.

3.1.4. - Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
  • Combine annotated bibliography, interview questions, and topic notes on the group wiki.
  • At the end of each class, teacher and classmates will post critiques for each project and offer comments, questions and suggestions.
  • At the end of the project, students will publish and present their podcasts to the school, and if they choose, on the Internet.

LESSON 3: Podcast Rubric
CATEGORY
Exemplary
Proficient
Partially Proficient
Unsatisfactory
POINTS
Introduction
9 points
6 points
3 points
0 points
_/10

Clear and concise introduction. Provides relevant information and establishes a clear purpose engaging the listener immediately.
Describes the topic and engages the audience as the introduction proceeds.
Somewhat engaging (covers well-known topic), and provides a vague purpose.
Irrelevant or inappropriate topic that minimally engages listener. Does not include an introduction or the purpose is vague and unclear.


Tells who is speaking, tells who the speaker is pretending to be, date the podcast was produced, and where the speaker is located.
Tells most of the following: who is speaking, date of the podcast, and location of speaker.
Alludes to who is speaking, date of the podcast, and location of speaker.
Speaker is not identified. No production date or location of the speaker is provided.

Content
9 points
6 points
3 points
0 points
_/20

Creativity and original content enhance the purpose of the podcast in an innovative way. Accurate information about artist and succinct concepts are presented.
Accurate information is provided succinctly.
Some information is inaccurate or long-winded.
Information is inaccurate.


Vocabulary enhances content.
Vocabulary is appropriate.
Vocabulary is adequate.
Vocabulary is inappropriate for the audience.


Includes a wide variety of appropriate, well-researched and informative sources and has well-edited quotes from “expert” sources. Quotes and sources of information are credited appropriately.
Includes appropriate and informative quotes from “expert” sources. Source quotes are credited appropriately.
Includes some variety of informative quotes from some “expert” sources. Source quotes need some editing and some credits are missing.
Includes no source quotes.


Keeps focus on the topic.
Stays on the topic.
Occasionally strays from the topic.
Does not stay on topic.


Conclusion clearly summarizes key information.
Conclusion summarizes information.
Conclusion vaguely summarizes key information
No conclusion is provided.

Delivery
3 points
2 points
1 point
0 points
_/10

Well rehearsed, smooth delivery in a conversational style.
Rehearsed, smooth delivery.
Appears unrehearsed with uneven delivery.
Delivery is hesitant, and choppy and sounds like the presenter is reading.


Highly effective enunciation, expression, and rhythm keep the audience listening.
Enunciation, expression, pacing are effective.
Enunciation, expression, rhythm are sometimes distracting.
Enunciation of spoken word is not clearly understandable or expression, and rhythm are distracting throughout the podcast.


Correct grammar is used throughout the podcast.
Correct grammar is used during the podcast.
Occasionally incorrect grammar is used during the podcast.
Poor grammar is used throughout the podcast.

Interview
6 points
4 points
2 points
0 points
_/20

Open ended questions and follow-up are used that draw interesting and relevant information from the interviewee.
Open ended questions and follow-up questions are used appropriately.
Open ended questions and follow-up questions are occasionally irrelevant to the topic.
Only yes-or-no questions are used. No follow-up questions are asked.

Graphic and Music Enhancements
6 points
4 points
2 points
0 points
_/15

Music enhances the mood, quality, and understanding of the presentation.
Music provides supportive background to the podcast.
Music provides somewhat distracting background to the podcast.
Music is distracting to presentation.


All music/sound enhancements are owned by the creator of the podcast or copyright cleared with appropriate documentation.
Graphic and sound enhancements are owned by the creator of the podcast or copyright cleared.
Use of copyrighted works is questionable.
Copyright infringement is obvious.

Technical Production
6 points
4 points
2 points
0 points
_/10

Transitions are smooth and spaced correctly without noisy, dead space.
Transitions are smooth with a minimal amount of ambient noise.
Transitions are uneven with inconsistent spacing; ambient noise is present.
Transitions are abrupt and background noise needs to be filtered.


Volume of voice, music, and effects enhance the presentation.
Volume is acceptable.
Volume is occasionally inconsistent.
Volume changes are highly distracting.


Podcast length keeps the audience interested and engaged.
Podcast length keeps audience listening.
Podcast length is somewhat long or somewhat short to keep audience engaged.
Podcast is either too long or too short to keep the audience engaged.

Group/Partner Work
6 points
4 points
2 points
0 points
_/15

All team members contributed equally to the finished product and assist in editing process by offering critique and sharing in skill development.
Assisted group/partner.
Finished own part but did not assist group/partner.
Contributed little to the project.


Performed all duties of assigned team role and contributes knowledge, opinions, and skills to share with the team. Always did the assigned work.
Performed nearly all duties and contributed knowledge, opinions, and skills to share with the team. Completed the assigned work.

Did not perform any duties of assigned team role and did not contribute knowledge, opinions or skills to share with the team. Relied on others to do the work.

TOTAL POINTS




_/100

NETS Standards
1.
Creativity and Innovation

Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students:


a.
apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
b.
create original works as a means of personal or group expression.


2.
Communication and Collaboration

Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:


a.
interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
b.
communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.


d.
contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.


6.
Technology Operations and Concepts

Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students:


a.
understand and use technology systems.
b.
select and use applications effectively and productively.
c.
troubleshoot systems and applications.
d.
transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.


Resources for Students and Teachers:

Podcasting:
Audacity: http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
Internet Archive: http://www.archive.org/index.php (free sound clips to enhance podcast)
Apple, Making a Podcast: http://www.apple.com/itunes/podcasts/specs.html
How to Podcast: http://www.how-to-podcast-tutorial.com/00-podcast-tutorial-four-ps.htm
Podcast Tutorial: http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/ict/podcasting.htm

Museum resources:
National Gallery of Art, www.nga.gov/
Metropolitan Museum of Art, www.metmuseum.org/
Museum of Modern Art, www.moma.org/
Smithsonian American Art Museum. http://americanart.si.edu/

Creating interview questions:
Purdue online: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/559/06/
Artist Interviews: http://thinkingaboutart.blogs.com/art/2005/09/artists_intervi_3.html

Standards:

AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner: http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/standards
ISTE National Education Technology Standards: http://www.iste.org/standards.aspx